HALLOWEEN ON A BUDGET

KEEP YOUR HALLOWEEN BUDGET IN CHECK WITH AFFORDABLE COSTUMES FROM GOODWILL®

When it comes to finding your ideal Halloween costume, Goodwill® stores offer unlimited possibilities for the budget conscious. With the economy still in recovery mode, why pay full price for a costume when you can find the materials to create your own for a fraction of the price?

While Halloween stores offer costumes, many are mass-produced with marked up prices. Goodwill offers affordable options for anyone to create one-of-a-kind outfits without breaking the bank. With items in every shape, size, and color — and from various eras — you can rest assured you will not run into anyone wearing the exact same costume.

With a little creativity and out-of-the-box thinking, anyone can find an ideal costume for less at Goodwill. The 6 locations in Lincoln and York are full of everything you need this Halloween.

“Goodwill is a one-stop shop for costumes for the entire family. Not only is the whole process of shopping and creating costumes fun, it helps our community members,” said Amanda Herndon, Communications Specialist of Goodwill Industries Serving Southeast Nebraska, Inc. “Revenues from your Halloween costume purchase fund Goodwill’s job training and career services for people in the Lincoln Community.”

Shopping at Goodwill helps our community. In 2011 alone, Goodwill store revenues helped deliver employment and training programs to 2,514 people. 1,662 of those people were served at Goodwill’s Job Connection Computer Lab located at Workforce Development’s One Stop Career Center. Goodwill helps people who face barriers to employment gain the skills and confidence necessary to gain meaningful employment.

People are looking for value when they shop for Halloween, and they are concerned about high unemployment rates in their communities. Goodwill helps solve both of these concerns by providing affordable Halloween costume options, which in turn help Goodwill fulfill its mission of helping people in need reach their full potential through education and the power of work.

THE YOUNKERS SEMI-ANNUAL GOODWILL SALE

SAVE ON FALL FASHION TRENDS AND CONTRIBUTE TO YOUR COMMUNITY DURING THE YOUNKERS SEMI-ANNUAL GOODWILL® SALE

EARN DISCOUNTS AT YOUNKERS STORES WHILE SUPPORTING GOODWILL INDUSTRIES SERVING SOUTHEAST NEBRASKA, INC. JOB TRAINING PROGRAMS

LINCOLN, NE — While high-end fashion houses are heading to New York for Fashion Week, be sure to follow the fashion leads and take advantage of the fall deals at your local Younkers store. While you’re there, check out the semi-annual Goodwill Sale, taking place September 12-29. When you donate your gently-used clothing at any of the 272 Bon-Ton locations, you’ll receive a coupon to purchase Younkers’ line-up of fabulous fall fashions. Your donated items will be sold at Goodwill Industries Serving Southeast Nebraska, Inc. stores, where the revenues fund job training and placement services to help people in the Lincoln community find and keep jobs.

Customers will receive a discount coupon for each item of clothing or textile they donate. The coupon can be used at any Bon-Ton, Bergner’s, Boston Store, Carson’s, Elder-Beerman, Herberger’s, Younkers or Parisian store to purchase women’s, men’s and children’s apparel, shoes, handbags, luggage, fragrances and more at a discount ranging from 15-20 percent.

Those who donate during the Goodwill Sale can take pride in knowing their Goodwill donations provide numerous job opportunities for people with disabilities and disadvantages. Goodwill Industries provides a broad array of services that help people who face barriers to employment. One of these programs is their Job Connection computer lab, located in Work Force Development’s One Stop Career Center. The Job Connection computer lab is open to the public with Employment Specialists on hand to help individuals maximize their online job searches and prepare their resumes.

“Goodwill Industries Serving Southeast Nebraska, Inc. was founded on the belief that every person should have the opportunity to achieve independence through the power of work,” said Joanne Pickrel, CEO. “Our donors, including those who participate in the semi-annual Goodwill Sale, enable us to design programs to help thousands of job seekers, innovating as we see fit to help individuals and families in Lincoln.”

Customers who donate at any Younkers during the Goodwill Sale can also pledge their support for Goodwill’s mission of employment and training by registering their donation on www.millionactsofgoodwill.com and receive a coupon for a 25 percent discount to use at any Younkers. Web visitors will also be able to play the “Closet Clean Out Giveaway Instant Win Game,” for a chance to win a Bon-Ton gift card instantly and be entered into a sweepstakes for a chance to win a $1,000 shopping spree.

“Through the semi-annual Goodwill sale, our goal is to collect more than 6.5 million pounds of gently used clothing and textiles to donate to Goodwill to assist people who face challenges to finding employment in neighboring communities where Bon-Ton stores are present,” said Brendan L. Hoffman, president and chief executive officer of The Bon-Ton Stores, Inc. “This is our customers’ favorite sale because it gives them an opportunity to donate to help a great organization and get special deals on new fall merchandise.”

About Goodwill Industries Serving Southeast Nebraska, Inc.:

Goodwill Industries Serving Southeast Nebraska, Inc.’s mission is willing workers employed and community resources maximized. Through programs that train individuals with barriers to employment and help them find paying work, Goodwill serves the Lincoln community with results of lower unemployment and less reliance on government assitance. Additionally, Goodwill contributes to ecological balance through massive recycling efforts of unsaleable textiles and other products. The community can support Goodwill all year long by donating their gently-used items, shopping at Goodwill Stores and making tax-deductble financial donations. Revenue for Goodwill comes from a variety of sources. The sale of donated goods remains the greatest source of funding for programs Goodwill provides. Learn more at www.lincolngoodwill.org.

About The Bon-Ton Stores, Inc.

The Bon-Ton Stores, Inc., with corporate headquarters in York, Pennsylvania and Milwaukee, Wisconsin, operates 272 department stores, which include 11 furniture galleries, in 23 states in the Northeast, Midwest and upper Great Plains under the Bon-Ton, Bergner’s, Boston Store, Carson’s, Elder-Beerman, Herberger’s and Younkers nameplates and, in the Detroit, Michigan area, under the Parisian nameplate. The stores offer a broad assortment of national and private brand fashion apparel and accessories for women, men and children, as well as cosmetics and home furnishings. The Bon-Ton Stores, Inc. is an active and positive participant in the communities it serves. The Goodwill Sale event is a long-standing charitable partnership the Company developed to support and build strong communities. For further information, please visit the investor relations section of the Company’s web site at http://investors.bonton.com. Facebook.com/bonton Twitter: @thebonton

CONTACT:
Amanda Herndon, Goodwill Industries Serving Southeast Nebraska, Inc.
Phone: (402) 742-8449
amanda@lincolngoodwill.org
Christine Hojnacki, Bon-Ton
Phone: (414) 347-5329 c 262-378-9354
christine.hojnacki@bonton.com

UNL STUDENTS DELIVER GREAT IDEAS TO GOODWILL

UNL Advertising and Public Relations Capstone Class Delivers Great Ideas to Goodwill

Senior advertising and public relations majors from the UNL College of Journalism and Mass Communications presented three distinct integrated marketing communications campaigns to Goodwill in Lincoln on Tuesday, December 4, 2012.

“This capstone class places the students in the roles found in real world scenarios, including dealing with unique business models and client feedback,” according to Stacy James, their professor. “They need to be prepared to deliver a strategic campaign and tell why it will produce the outcomes the client desires.”

Students met with Goodwill staff at the beginning of the semester to gather information with the goal of building awareness about Goodwill programs. Then, with the guidance of Professor James, set out to apply what they have learned about IMC campaigns from demographics research to creating the messages and budgeting for the paid, owned and earned media recommendations.

“We had a great team experience coming up with ideas this semester!” said senior ADPR major Paden Unruh after the projects were complete. The students turned over digital files and materials that are media purchase ready for Goodwill.

“Choosing which campaign to use first will not be easy,” said Joanne Pickrel, CEO for Goodwill in Lincoln. “What made this project even better is that one of the students approached me to share that learning about Goodwill moved her to refer a loved one in another state to Goodwill for services. We hope this project keeps Goodwill on their minds and the minds of our customers and donors for a long time,” Pickrel concluded.

GOODWILL ACHIEVES THREE-YEAR CARF ACCREDITATION

Goodwill Achieves Three-Year CARF Accreditation

Goodwill Industries Serving Southeast Nebraska, Inc. has been informed by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitative Facilities (CARF) that it has been accredited for a period of three years for its Organizational Employment Services program and Employment Development Services program. Furthermore, this accreditation came with no recommendations from CARF regarding the organization or its programming. This is an extraordinary accomplishment as only 3 percent of CARF accredited organizations receive no recommendations.

This accreditation outcome, which represents the highest level of accreditation, is awarded to organizations that show substantial fulfillment of the standards established by CARF. As well, Goodwill demonstrated exemplary conformance to standards by developing a Crisis Communication Plan which clearly identifies the steps for the organization to follow when faced with a crisis. An organization receiving a three-year Accreditation outcome has put itself through a rigorous peer review process and has demonstrated that its programs and services are of the highest quality, measurable, and accountable. Further, an organization accredited for three years clearly indicates that present conditions represent an established pattern of total operations that is likely to be maintained or improved in the foreseeable future.

The latest action marks the seventh consecutive three-year Accreditation outcomes awarded to Goodwill Industries Serving Southeast Nebraska, Inc. by CARF, an international accrediting body.

About CARF

CARF is an independent, not-for-profit accrediting body promoting quality, value, and optimal outcomes of services through a consultative accreditation process that centers on enhancing the lives of the persons served. Since 1966, CARF has established consumer-focused standards to help organizations measure and improve the quality of their programs and services.

GOODWILL COLLABORATES WITH LINCOLN LITERACY

Goodwill Industries and Lincoln Literacy Partner for Job Skills Education

Beginning March 1st, 2012 Goodwill Industries Serving Southeast Nebraska, Inc. began collaborating with Lincoln Literacy in an effort to help those with limited English proficiency acquire the skills needed to search for and maintain employment. Goodwill already helps individuals who face barriers to employment at their Job Connection computer lab, located in Workforce Development. At the lab, individuals may receive assistance from employment specialists with resume and cover letter creation, online applications, and classes or tutorials for basic computer skills, typing and data entry. Lincoln Literacy’s current Workforce Readiness English program teaches students vocabulary, equips them with job-seeking skills, and prepares students for participation in the Nebraska workforce. Through a grant given by Goodwill, it is hopeful that the two organizations will be able to serve more people through these programs.

“This partnership is a win-win-win,” said Lincoln Literacy Executive Director Clayton Naff. “It will benefit Lincoln Literacy, Goodwill, and most importantly, the refugee and immigrant families who are our students.”

The goal of this partnership is to create a smooth transition between the programs and workforce for students. Selected Workforce Readiness students will undergo a brief training session and be personally guided through the registration process at the One Stop Career Center, where Goodwill provides a variety of employment services. “It can be difficult to navigate through two separate programs, especially for students learning English,” said Naff. “Working together, we can make sure that our students have a smooth transition and that they are able to take full advantage of all of the services available.”

GOODWILL COLLABORATES WITH COMMUNITY JUSTICE CENTER

Goodwill Industries and Community Justice Center Partner for Job Skills Education

Beginning March 1st, 2012 Goodwill Industries Serving Southeast Nebraska, Inc. began collaborating with Community Justice Center in an effort to help those reentering the workforce following incarceration gain meaningful employment and improve public safety. Goodwill teaches Employment Skills and Life Skills classes to those on probation or parole at the Lancaster County Adult Probation Day Reporting Center and has been looking for a way to expand their services to this population. Community Justice Center offers programming to help offenders with the victim and community impact portion of their rehabilitation. Through a grant given by Goodwill, it is hopeful that the two agencies will be able to serve more people through these programs and continue to help the community by lowering the recidivism rate.

The goal of this partnership is to create a smooth transition back into the community for those being released from prison by helping them find meaningful employment and decrease their chances of reoffending. “One of the major indicators that an offender is going back to prison is if he or she is not working; assisting individuals who are transiting out of prison secure employment is directly related to public safety” said Community Justice Center Executive Director Jim Jones. “This powerful collaborative effort between Goodwill and CJC will not only improve public safety but also increase the number of individuals contributing to their communities (paying taxes), not taking from it!” Community Justice Center will include Goodwill’s Employment Readiness classes within their own programming taught inside the prison while Goodwill continues to serve these individuals through their current DRC and Job Connection programs.

SPRING CLEANING HELPS OTHERS FIND JOBS

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

February 23, 2012

SPRING CLEANING HELPS OTHERS FIND JOBS
Goodwill® Donations Fund Career Services for People Who Are Unemployed in Lincoln

Lincoln, NE — Although we often hear in the news that our city enjoys a low unemployment rate, these statistics are little consolation for those who remain unemployed due to barriers to employment or to those who are underemployed. Many people in our community still have difficulty entering the labor market and providing for their families. The simple act of cleaning out your closets and donating to Goodwill this spring will provide critical career services and programs to help people who are unemployed in Lincoln to once again earn paychecks.

“People without jobs, especially those who have been unemployed for long periods of time, need the extra attention and support that Goodwill has provided in Lincoln for eighty years.” said Joanne Pickrel, CEO

The end of winter has long signaled the perfect time to declutter closets, attics and other storage spaces. Yet, spring cleaning has benefits beyond tidier households. A family’s donation of gently used clothing and household goods can be sold in Goodwill stores and online at shopgoodwill.com®. The revenues fund Goodwill’s community-based services that can lead to jobs and fresh starts for people without jobs. Goodwill provides career services that anyone in southeast Nebraska can use to boost their chances of getting hired, including assistance in writing a résumé, job interview practice and access to job leads with leading employers.

During spring cleaning, families can make the best use of their storage spaces by keeping their belongings organized. Lorie Marrero, Certified Professional Organizer® and organizing expert for Good Housekeeping magazine, provides useful tips and techniques to help families keep their spaces streamlined. As a spokesperson for Goodwill’s Donate Movement, she can speak on the positive impact donated items can have on people in local communities. Marrero is also the author of The Clutter Diet: The Skinny on Organizing Your Home and Taking Control of Your Life, and creator of the ClutterDiet.com, an online program that helps people stay organized.

“When your spring cleaning ends with a donation to Goodwill, people looking for employment right here in Lincoln will benefit from your generosity,” said Pickrel. “Your donations fund Goodwill’s employment programs that create jobs and strengthen families and the economic health of our community.”

Goodwill Industries Serving Southeast Nebraska, Inc.’s mission is willing workers employed and community resources maximized. Through programs that train individuals with barriers to employment and help them find paying work, Goodwill serves the Lincoln community with results of lower unemployment and less reliance on government assitance. Additionally, Goodwill contributes to ecological balance through massive recycling efforts of unsaleable textiles and other products.

The community can support Goodwill all year long by donating their gently-used items, shopping at Goodwill Stores and making tax-deductble financial donations.

Goodwill Industries Serving Southeast Nebraska, Inc. serves such populations as people with physical, mental and emotional disabilities, those who have been recently incarcerated, and new Americans and refugees. Revenue for Goodwill comes from a variety of sources. The sale of donated goods remains the greatest source of funding for programs Goodwill provides. Learn more at www.lincolngoodwill.org.

Amanda Herndon
Communications Specialist
amanda@lincolngoodwill.org
(402) 438-2022 ext. 118
www.lincolngoodwill.org
www.facebook.com/LincolnGoodwill

BAKER’S CANDIES NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 23, 2012

SPRING CLEANING HELPS OTHERS FIND JOBS
Goodwill® Donations Fund Career Services for People Who Are Unemployed in Lincoln

Lincoln, NE — Although we often hear in the news that our city enjoys a low unemployment rate, these statistics are little consolation for those who remain unemployed due to barriers to employment or to those who are underemployed. Many people in our community still have difficulty entering the labor market and providing for their families. The simple act of cleaning out your closets and donating to Goodwill this spring will provide critical career services and programs to help people who are unemployed in Lincoln to once again earn paychecks.

“People without jobs, especially those who have been unemployed for long periods of time, need the extra attention and support that Goodwill has provided in Lincoln for eighty years.” said Joanne Pickrel, CEO

The end of winter has long signaled the perfect time to declutter closets, attics and other storage spaces. Yet, spring cleaning has benefits beyond tidier households. A family’s donation of gently used clothing and household goods can be sold in Goodwill stores and online at shopgoodwill.com®. The revenues fund Goodwill’s community-based services that can lead to jobs and fresh starts for people without jobs. Goodwill provides career services that anyone in southeast Nebraska can use to boost their chances of getting hired, including assistance in writing a résumé, job interview practice and access to job leads with leading employers.

During spring cleaning, families can make the best use of their storage spaces by keeping their belongings organized. Lorie Marrero, Certified Professional Organizer® and organizing expert for Good Housekeeping magazine, provides useful tips and techniques to help families keep their spaces streamlined. As a spokesperson for Goodwill’s Donate Movement, she can speak on the positive impact donated items can have on people in local communities. Marrero is also the author of The Clutter Diet: The Skinny on Organizing Your Home and Taking Control of Your Life, and creator of the ClutterDiet.com, an online program that helps people stay organized.

“When your spring cleaning ends with a donation to Goodwill, people looking for employment right here in Lincoln will benefit from your generosity,” said Pickrel. “Your donations fund Goodwill’s employment programs that create jobs and strengthen families and the economic health of our community.”

Goodwill Industries Serving Southeast Nebraska, Inc.’s mission is willing workers employed and community resources maximized. Through programs that train individuals with barriers to employment and help them find paying work, Goodwill serves the Lincoln community with results of lower unemployment and less reliance on government assitance. Additionally, Goodwill contributes to ecological balance through massive recycling efforts of unsaleable textiles and other products.

The community can support Goodwill all year long by donating their gently-used items, shopping at Goodwill Stores and making tax-deductble financial donations.

Goodwill Industries Serving Southeast Nebraska, Inc. serves such populations as people with physical, mental and emotional disabilities, those who have been recently incarcerated, and new Americans and refugees. Revenue for Goodwill comes from a variety of sources. The sale of donated goods remains the greatest source of funding for programs Goodwill provides. Learn more at www.lincolngoodwill.org.

Amanda Herndon
Communications Specialist
amanda@lincolngoodwill.org
(402) 438-2022 ext. 118
www.lincolngoodwill.org
www.facebook.com/LincolnGoodwill

RANDOM ACTS OF KINDNESS WEEK

FEBRUARY 13TH BEGINS NATIONAL RANDOM ACTS OF KINDNESS WEEK!
Throughout our busy days, it is easy to forget about the spirit of kindness and the simple actions that can be taken to show kindness to others. During the second full week in February, make it a goal to do at least one act of kindness that is out of your general scope each day. Even if the action is small, it could mean a great deal to someone.

To find ideas or read others’ stories about when someone showed them kindness, visit www.randomactsofkindness.org